Mini Courses, Conversations & Storytelling (Full Summaries)

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7 (10:45 AM - 12:45 PM)

RISE UP: An American Curriculum

Michelle Lee, The Whole Story

A collaboration between Rise Up! and Whole Story Group, this workshop uses creative inquiry to explore Hamilton: An American Musical. Explore lessons that help students to understand and critically examine Hamilton themes and artistry, and to express their own personal narrative through writing and performance. Using Heavy Is the Hyphen: The Listener, participants will see how the lesson develops learners’ capacity to listen deeply as a preparation for future introductory poetry and letter-writing lessons, inviting students to see and be seen, hear and be heard.

Teaching to Reconnect, Heal and Regenerate: Day #1

Carlee Adamson and Michele Hamilton, Pear Tree  Pre-School

This two-part workshop* first introduces a framework for examining the ways in which our earliest experiences and patterning shape our ways of seeing the world and each other and impact our teaching. Participants will experience art and movement as vehicles for exploration of this framework and begin to consider the implications for their work. On Day 2 (Wednesday, August 8)  participants will consider their own practice and the ways they might apply the learnings from the previous day. They will experience small group support structures as well as creative applications all of which can be transferred to various teaching contexts. The hope is that participants will not only gain self-awareness and practical approaches to applying a healing frame to their work, but also learn and practice multiple strategies for immediate use in their contexts. *Please note that Day #1 (August 7) is a prerequisite for Day #2 (August 8).

Going Meta with Metaphor

Natan Kuchar, Jewish Community High School of the Bay Area

Charles Eames said “eventually everything connects”, and in this workshop, participants will explore how exploding the use of metaphor (in songwriting, poetry, visual art & design) provides us with a portal toward deep understanding, empathy and a more vivid look at the way humans think and make connection. We will use singing, lyric writing and little bit of “faux string theory” to find new appreciation for teaching and using metaphor.

Academic & Social Emotional Learning

Carrie Wilson and Jennifer Ahn, Mills Teacher Scholars

What are Social Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies and how are they connected to academic content learning? How can we use this inherent interconnectedness to strengthen learners’ cognitive and non-cognitive skills? In what ways does the process of collaborative inquiry support make this intersection visible to teachers?

Five Simple Strategies for Promoting Critical and Creative Thinking

Indi McCasey, Alameda County Office of Education & Oakland Unified School District

In this interactive workshop, explore five key Visible Thinking Routines developed by Harvard’s Project Zero. These simple strategies provide a structure that makes students’ thinking visible to themselves and their peers, while at the same time helping educators to assess their students for understanding. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7 (2:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

Art-Centered Literacy for Equity

Derek Fenner, Alameda County Office of Education

Rooted in culturally and linguistically relevant pedagogy,      this workshop highlights the need to amplify youth voice and justice issues in and through the arts. Engage in a set of art-centered literacy strategies (visual, written, and theater), designed to support all learners but with an emphasis on struggling readers and English learners.

Print – Organize – Protest (This course is repeated on Thursday aft)

Susan Wolf, Alameda County Office of Education
Brennan Popovic, Printmaker

Printmakers have historically connected imagery and powerful text to catalyze social action. How can educators support student leaders with socially engaged art practices to amplify their voice and influence policy? 

Embedding Dance, Race and Equity: A Continuous Practice

Cherie Hill, Luna Dance Institute

Learn multi-cultural communication tools and participate in an interactive dialogue around white supremacy cultural norms and their effects on educators and organizations.  Experience how this work can be integrated into dance. The course has a practical application to educators and organizations who seek to begin or expand efforts to bring conversations and awareness about race and equity to the forefront of their practice.

Overcoming the Blank Page: Strategies for Teaching Creativity

Gaia Pine, San Leandro Unified School District

Explore a set of strategies for cultivating creativity in yourselves and others in this highly interactive workshop. Using collage and poetry, discover ways to address the tension between learning technique and developing originality without waiting for inspiration. Educators experiencing “art-phobia” are particularly encouraged to attend.

Starting with Self: Looking Inward as a Step towards Culturally Responsive Teaching

         Lara Dossett, University of Texas, Austin

How can educators create learning spaces that employ culturally relevant teaching practices? Through visual, oral, and embodied methods you will consider how our identities and values shape our interactions with students and the learning culture of our classrooms. By exploring practical arts-based strategies we will enter a space of reflection/introspection and employ culturally responsive teaching we can use in our own places of learning.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8 (10:45 AM - 12:45 PM)

Animating a Community Plan to Transform Public Education: In Policy and Practice (A Conversation)

Jean Johnstone, Teaching Artists Guild & Alliance for ALL
Pam Lopez, K Street Consulting

Engage with the Community Plan "Arts and Creativity: From the Margins to the Core" created by the partners of the Alliance for Arts Learning Leadership of the Bay Area to transform public education in the region via the arts. Jean Johnstone, Interim Director of the Alliance joins local policy makers and Pam Lopez, a lobbyist who advocates for the ACOE in Sacramento on education issues. Learn ways to effectively bring about the changes the community wants to see, through policy and practice. 

Teaching to Reconnect, Heal and Regenerate: Day #2

Carlee Adamson and Michele Hamilton, Pear Tree Pre-School

This two-part workshop* first introduces a framework for examining the ways in which our earliest experiences and patterning shape our ways of seeing the world and each other and impact our teaching. Participants will experience art and movement as vehicles for exploration of this framework and begin to consider the implications for their work. On Day 2  (August 8) participants will consider their own practice and the ways they might apply the learnings from the previous day. They will experience small group support structures as well as creative applications all of which can be transferred to various teaching contexts. The hope is that participants will not only gain self-awareness and practical approaches to applying a healing frame to their work, but also learn and practice multiple strategies for immediate use in their contexts. *Please note that Day #1 (August 7) is a prerequisite for Day #2 (August 8).

Freedom Through the Arts:  Exploration of Black Youth Voice, Art and Community 

Mahea Gaskins, The Village Method (TVM)

Dance, poetry, mural making and spoken word are beautiful ways to explore self, family and community. Explore methods to engage youth families and community through art with less stress and more fun. Discover how to create collaborative atmospheres for learning while integrating multiple forms of artistic expressions. Engage in activities that explore mural making, poetry and dance from the Harlem Renaissance while being led by middle school TVM scholars, artists & educator. 

Integration for All Kinds of Minds and Every Body

Nancy James, San Leandro Unified School District

Explore an approach to Arts Integration that recognizes neurological and physical-­diversity in every learning environment, and builds on multi-­sensory supports to meet the individual strengths and needs of typical and atypical learners. Learn and experience a variety of strategies that can support building flexibility into your instruction from the ground up. Conside the learning differences and think about how educators can make room for a variety of learners. Reflect on your teaching practices and explore and reshape your learning environments

REACH Back, REACH In, REACH Forward  

Joaquin Newman and Jerarde Gutierrez, REACH Ashland Youth Center

Learn about the REACH Ashland Youth Center, its history of student courage and leadership, its present and its potential for inspiring future similar centers and places of safety, equity, creativity and learning and development for all young people.  Engage in hands-on arts activities that are signature practices of REACH to find how this can work in your community.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8 (2:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

Lifting Up Leadership, A Conversation

Trena Noval, Alameda County Office of Education
Sonia Manjon, LeaderSpring

Join an interactive conversation about the practice of leadership in schools. We will look across school communities for how leadership is lifted up and how school stakeholders (including students, parents, community members and districts) work with schools site leaders (principals and teacher leaders) in using the pedagogies and practice of Integrated Learning as strategies for leadership success and as a systems approach for building capacity and transformational thinking.

Embodied Racial Justice: Mobilizing White Anti Racist Activism through Movement Metaphor

Rebecca Prather and Susan Wolf, Alameda County Office of Education

By attuning attention to the body’s experiential tracking of dis-ease with racism, one can also hone embodied resolve to intervene in racism as well as harvest strategic practices of anti-racist activism of physical, mental, and emotional agency. The workshop’s container of movement and metaphor will offer an opportunity to create choreographies of courage. 

All identities and racial affiliations are welcome. The facilitators of this workshop are two white women committed to the lifelong work of racial justice work that imperatively requires that white people strategize and commit to deep anti-racist work. We recognize that the trappings of our skin privilege include blind spots and invite the conversation and critique of how to do this work “better” while recognizing that we must actually start the work in order to grow skills.

Making Art for Non-Artists

Todd Berman, The Art Don't Stop

Begin with a scribbling exercise and escalate into a meaningful multi-media collaborative art project to understand how even 'non-artists,' can use art for teaching, learning, and building community. Learn how art can function as a practice in observation and experimentation and get the mind focused on solving a problem. We will incorporate learning experiences through emotional recordings, and then allow for other elements to come into play, based on the inspirations and accidents of the art process.

Principles for Equity in the Arts

Sheryl Evans Davis and Noah Frigault, San Francisco Human Rights Commission

Explore a framework meant to ensure that community is involved in arts programming that yields mutual benefit. The framework was developed by the 2017 Equity Fellows of the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Learn how to apply the framework to your own arts programming and social justice art activities that can be used with your students and colleagues. Receive your own copy of the Principles booklet.

Building Community and Sharing Practice in the Classroom

         Dominique Enriquez, Junior Center of Art and Science

Interested in exploring new ways for your students to share their learning?  Attend this interactive workshop where you will deconstruct and play with the Curriculum Slam/Pecha Kucha format - a community-building affair meant for creatives to share practice among their peers.  Learn to apply the community building and practice sharing components of this form as a way to cultivate community in the classroom. Investigate the use of imagery and storytelling as a means to build your reflective practice.  You will have time to experience this format and explore ways to bring it into your own classroom.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9 (10:45 AM - 12:45 PM)

What Is Your Maker Identity and Why is it Important?               

Susan Wolf, Alameda County Office of Education
Reina Cabezas and Cicely A. Day, Oakland Unified School District. All are Agency by Design Fellows

Culturally responsive making does more that sit on the surface of technology. It asks the maker to thoughtfully curate their materials and to reach backwards to investigate the lineage and heritage of makers in their family and community. Choose from several immersive projects as a foundation your maker identity.

ILSP: What's the Special Sauce?

Integrated Learning Specialist Program (ILSP) Faculty

Come get a taste of the principles of the Integrated Learning Specialist Program. Over 2000 teachers have earned their ILSP certificate and are transforming their classroom practices throughout the Bay Area. Sample the three ingredients that make this program so authentic and powerful: research-based frameworks, cultural responsiveness and contemporary art practice. 

Stitch, Resist. Persist: Youth Voice Through Textile Art

Sara K. Trail and Crystal P. Ward, Social Justice Sewing Academy

Community arts settings can cultivate generative spaces for young people to reflect upon their identities and experiences, dialogue on local issues, and create art inspired by and responsive to local communities and cultures. Learn about Social Justice Sewing Academy's Theory of Change and ways   to incorporate social justice art practices into your classroom - and create your own quilt block!

Reading the World: Looking at Art with a Critical Lens

Julie Charles and Jessalyn Aaland, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

How can we teach students, as Freire believed, to read both the word and the world? Looking with critical lenses helps students develop intersectional thinking and critically interpret their daily lives. Using artworks in SFMOMA’s collection as the basis for discussion, you will engage in small and large group discussions to analyze artworks from various critical lenses.

The Art of Self Care

Michelle Holdt, Arts Ed Matters

In this hands-on workshop participants will be introduced to three effective self-care strategies they can practice at home and in the classroom. Art Making, Mindfulness, & Gratitude for What Is. We will make arts-based journals, learn mindfulness strategies, & reflect on our lives and dreams! This workshop is highly restorative!

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9 (2:00 PM - 4:00 PM)

Reading the Planet

Derek Fenner, Alameda County Office of Education

This session will amplify the power of finding yourself in the voice of another. Taking place on Ohlone land in the Redwood forest immediately outside Chabot, participants will have the opportunity to connect with wilderness literature while surrounded by the natural world. Come engage in making   text-to- self and text-to- world connections.

Print – Organize – Protest (Repeat)

Susan Wolf, Alameda County Office of Education
Brennan Popovic, Printmaker

Printmakers have historically connected imagery and powerful text to catalyze social action. How can educators support student leaders with socially engaged art practices to amplify their voice and influence policy? 

Verbatim Theater: Performing Community

Danielle Covington Former Member of OakTechRep, Current NYU Theater student.

Come learn to create theater by participating in a community story circle. Learn to conduct interview-based arts research through a process of interviewing, observing, and active listening. We will learn to collect important information about  a community, develop a sense of trust and understanding, and learn to embrace commonalities and differences between individuals and communities that extend past a surface level.

Shadow Journeys: Exploring History Through Shadow Puppetry

          Daniel Barash, The Shadow Puppet Workshop

Shadow puppetry, with its bold shapes, vivid colors, and dramatic          movement, is a highly engaging art form that allows students to express their understanding through visual art, drama, and writing.  Discover how   to create and use shadow puppets to explore story elements. First explore shadow puppetry techniques and learn ways students can use shadow puppetry to explore character, setting, problem and plot. Then learn how students can create puppets and scenery to dramatically bring stories created through a “Story Challenge Game” to life behind the shadow screen.

Water Warriors: Integrative Learning Meets Climate Justice

Carl Anthony, M. Paloma Pavel, Breakthrough Communities
Carey Batha, San Francisco Bay Conservation & Development Commission
The Resilient Communities Initiative and Youth Leaders

Come explore on-going opportunities for linking environmental justice literacy with integrative learning. Learn to use the new interactive online tool, the Bay Area Flood Explorer and engage with a new toolkit integrating climate change, racial justice, big history and arts and culture.